Head sold at Christie’s stolen from Libya

01 Nov 2011 8:40 AM | Anonymous

Head sold at Christie’s stolen from Libya

Italian buyer has voluntarily relinquished the work

By Martin Bailey | From issue 229, November 2011
Published online 31 Oct 11 (News)

Christie’s described the piece as “a Roman marble portrait head of a woman, circa first century AD”, suggesting that the life-size sculpture had been made in “an eastern workshop, perhaps Egypt”

Christie’s described the piece as “a Roman marble portrait head of a woman, circa first century AD”, suggesting that the life-size sculpture had been made in “an eastern workshop, perhaps Egypt”

london. A Roman head of a woman, which was sold at Christie’s in London on 14 April, had been stolen in Libya. It was bought at auction by an Italian for £91,250 and has now been recovered in Italy by the carabinieri.

Christie’s described it as “a Roman marble portrait head of a woman, circa first century AD”, suggesting that the life-size sculpture had been made in “an eastern workshop, perhaps Egypt”. The provenance was given as “private collection, Switzerland, circa 1975; acquired by the present owner in Switzerland in 1988”. At the time of the sale, an archaeologist contacted Christie’s to warn that lot 261 was the head of a statue at the Sabratha Museum, west of Tripoli; it had been detached and stolen in 1990.

http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/Head-sold-at-Christie-s-stolen-from-Libya/24901

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