How countries are successfully using the law to get looted cultural treasures back

24 Jun 2014 4:13 PM | Anonymous

How countries are successfully using the law to get looted cultural treasures back

Posted Jul 1, 2014 5:40 AM CDT
By Abby Seiff

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Photo of one of the Kneeling Attendants courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons.

For two decades, a pair of monumental statues guarded the entrance to the Southeast Asian galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. These days, all that remains of them are two faint patches on the floor where they stood until a year ago.

On May 20, 2013, the millennium-old statues, known as the Kneeling Attendants, disappeared. They were gently wrapped, crated and moved to a backroom so they could be returned to Cambodia, their country of origin.

The Kneeling Attendants date back to the 10th century, the heyday of Cambodia's Khmer empire. They were part of a temple complex called Koh Ker. In the early 1970s, when Cambodia became engulfed in a turbulent civil war, looting was rampant, and Cambodia's rich collection of temples was robbed of statuary and other valuable examples of the Khmer empire's cultural heritage.

 

 

http://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/how_countries_are_successfully_using_the_law_to_get_looted_cultural_treasur 

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