Egypt’s antiquities fall victim to political chaos

05 Dec 2013 12:06 PM | Anonymous

Egypt’s antiquities fall victim to political chaos

 

 

(Nariman El-Mofty/ Associated Press ) - In this Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013 photo, a security worker guards antiquities inside the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. The 111-year-old museum, a treasure trove of pharaonic antiquities, has long been one of the centerpieces of tourism to Egypt. But the constant instability since the 2011 uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak has dried up tourism to the country, slashing a key source of revenue. Moreover, political backbiting and attempts to stop corruption have had a knock-on effect of bringing a de facto ban on sending antiquities on tours to museums abroad, cutting off what was once a major source of funding for the museum.

  • (Nariman El-Mofty/ Associated Press ) - In this Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013 photo, a security worker guards antiquities inside the Egyptian Museum near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. The 111-year-old museum, a treasure trove of pharaonic antiquities, has long been one of the centerpieces of tourism to Egypt. But the constant instability since the 2011 uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak has dried up tourism to the country, slashing a key source of revenue. Moreover, political backbiting and attempts to stop corruption have had a knock-on effect of bringing a de facto ban on sending antiquities on tours to museums abroad, cutting off what was once a major source of funding for the museum.
  • (Nariman El-Mofty/ Associated Press ) - In this Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2013 photo, Egyptian security forces stand guard in front of the Egyptian museum near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. The 111-year-old museum, a treasure trove of pharaonic antiquities, has long been one of the centerpieces of tourism to Egypt. But the constant instability since the 2011 uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak has dried up tourism to the country, slashing a key source of revenue. Moreover, political backbiting and attempts to stop corruption have had a knock-on effect of bringing a de facto ban on sending antiquities on tours to museums abroad, cutting off what was once a major source of funding for the museum.

CAIRO undefined The home of Egypt’s mummies and King Tutankhamun’s treasures is trying to make the best out of the worst times of political turmoil. But the Egyptian Museum is taking a hammering on multiple levels, from riots on its doorstep to funding so meager it can’t keep up paper clip supplies for its staff.

The museum, a treasure trove of pharaonic antiquities, has long been one of the centerpieces of tourism to Egypt. But the constant instability since the 2011 uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak has dried up the industry, slashing a key source of revenue. Moreover, political backbiting and attempts to stop corruption have had a knock-on effect of bringing a de facto ban on sending antiquities on tours to museums abroad, cutting off what was once a major source of funding for the state.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/egypts-antiquities-fall-victim-to-political-chaos/2013/12/04/70a646e0-5cb7-11e3-8d24-31c016b976b2_story.html

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