Home isn’t always where the art is

13 Sep 2012 9:20 PM | Anonymous

Home isn’t always where the art is
 By Peter Aspden

As the drive to reclaim national treasures gathers pace, the restitution debate is growing ever more divisive

It is one of the art world’s greatest paradoxes: while the market for cultural treasures becomes more and more globalised, the clamour for those works to be repatriated to their country of origin becomes ever louder. In theory it has never been easier for museums, dealers and collectors to become international players on the art scene; in truth, it is getting more difficult by the day.

The claims for the restitution of works of art that are said to have been plundered from their native land grow apace. The case of the 10th-century Cambodian statue that was put up for auction last year by Sotheby’s, only to be blocked by a last-minute legal bid for repatriation, is only one recent example.


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/11f328dc-f8f6-11e1-b4ba-00144feabdc0.html#axzz26P2AJqO2

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