Cultural Heritage News

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 22 Sep 2014 4:29 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    A Sting in the Desert

    By Joe Mozingo

    Photography, video by Katie Falkenberg

    For generations, the people of the Four Corners region have battled the federal government over collecting and selling Native American artifacts. Then agents persuaded a local dealer to go undercover.

    Operation Cerberus Action was supposed to expose a lucrative trade in stolen antiquities.

    Instead, it tore a hole in a Utah town.


    In the high country of the Navajo reservation, a family walked through the pinyon pines, combing the earth for the remnants of a vanished civilization.

          

    Their breath steamed in the morning air. Dr. James Redd wandered away from his wife and daughter for a few minutes, then called back: “Hey guys, come and look.”

    He pointed to a white shell, smaller than a dime, lying partly exposed in the wind-scoured dirt. It had been carved in the shape of a bird, with a hole drilled through it.

    Millions of such artifacts lay strewn across the region. The doctor's wife, Jeannie Redd, reveled in the way the pieces connected her to the ancient Anasazi culture.

    Jim handed the shell to Jeannie, who hooked it on a safety pin and put it in her pocket, never imagining the trouble it would bring

    http://graphics.latimes.com/utah-sting/
  • 22 Sep 2014 1:28 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Threats to Cultural Heritage in Iraq and Syria


    Press Statement

    Jen Psaki
    Department Spokesperson

    Washington, DC

    September 21, 2014


    Secretary of State John Kerry will join the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas Campbell, and its president, Emily Rafferty, on September 22 to highlight the destruction of irreplaceable cultural heritage taking place throughout Iraq and Syria at the hands of violent extremists like the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and the Syrian regime.

    The event, to be held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City amid the United Nations General Assembly week, will feature a presentation by Professor Michael Danti and remarks from Secretary Kerry, Director General of UNESCO Irina Bokova, and other distinguished members of the preservation and museum community.

    http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2014/09/231912.htm

  • 22 Sep 2014 10:02 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    AAAS Satellite Image Analysis: Five of Six Syrian World Heritage Sites "Exhibit Significant Damage"

    In war-torn Syria, five of six World Heritage sites now "exhibit significant damage" and some structures have been "reduced to rubble," according to new high-resolution satellite image analysis by the nonprofit, nonpartisan American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

    The AAAS analysis, offering the first comprehensive look at the extent of damage to Syria's priceless cultural heritage sites, was completed in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's Penn Cultural Heritage Center (PennCHC) and the Smithsonian Institution, and in cooperation with the Syrian Heritage Task Force. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the analysis provides authoritative confirmation of previous on-the-ground reports of damage to individual sites.

    AAAS analyzed satellite images of six Syrian World Heritage sites: the Ancient City of Aleppo; the Ancient City of Bosra; the Ancient City of Damascus; the Ancient Site of Palmyra; a site encompassing two castles, Crac des Chevaliers and Qal’at Salah El-Din; and the Ancient Cities of Northern Syria (Jebel Seman, Jebel Barisha, Jebel Al A’la, Jebel Wastani, and Jebel Zawiye). | AAAS

    "Only one of Syria's six World Heritage sites undefined the Ancient City of Damascus undefined appears to remain undamaged in satellite imagery since the onset of civil war in 2011," said Susan Wolfinbarger, director of the Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project at AAAS. Historic structures at the other five sites, including ancient mosques, schools, and civilian as well as government buildings, have all been damaged and, in some cases, destroyed, AAAS reported. Wolfinbarger added, however, that "the Damascus site also could have damage not visible in satellite images."

    http://www.aaas.org/news/aaas-satellite-image-analysis-five-six-syrian-world-heritage-sites-exhibit-significant-damage

  • 18 Sep 2014 1:21 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Egypt recovers stolen fragments of Cheops pyramid   

    Egypt has recovered fragments from the pyramid of Cheops said to have been stolen by Germans, including part of a stone tablet identifying the pharaoh it was named after, state media reported Wednesday.

    The Egyptian foreign ministry handed over “samples stolen in the Cheops pyramid” to the antiquities ministry, said the official MENA news agency.

    http://english.alarabiya.net/en/life-style/art-and-culture/2014/09/17/Egypt-recovers-stolen-fragments-of-Cheops-pyramid-.html
  • 18 Sep 2014 1:19 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Cambodia's stolen warriors

    A special two-part investigation explores how a famous Cambodian temple statue ended up in a New York auction house.

    Last updated: 17 Sep 2014 18:55

    When he leafed through Sotheby's auction catalogue last year, archaeologist Simon Warrack could not believe what he saw. With a starting bid of $2m, a life-sized, 500-pound warrior statue dating back to the Cambodian Khmer dynasty was to be auctioned in New York. The catalogue boasted: 'If one could choose only one sculpture to symbolise the glory of Khmer art, this figure could fulfill such a challenge'.

    What the catalogue neglects to mention is that the spectacular statue watched over the temples of Koh Ker for more than 1,000 years, before Khmer Rouge looters cut him and his twin brother off their pedestals in the early 1970s. By selling scores of ancient artefacts like these to international art smuggling cartels, the communist group financed their bloody war in Cambodia, which claimed the lives of two million people.

    http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/101east/2014/09/cambodia-stolen-warriors-2014915214423584637.html

  • 15 Sep 2014 8:50 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Islamic State sells ‘blood antiquities’ from Iraq and Syria to raise money

    September 14 at 7:58 PM

    Mark Vlasic, a senior fellow and adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University, was the head of operations of the joint World Bank-U.N. Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative. He is also counselor to the Antiquities Coalition.

    As President Obama moves ahead with his plan to confront the so-called Islamic State, all options, as they say, should be on the table. Thus, while “kinetic force” is a likely focus, the terrorism financing must not be overlooked. By targeting one of the group’s funding sources, policy-makers can also help to preserve the history of ancient Mesopotamia, the cradle of civilization. What’s needed is an immediate, multifaceted initiative to curb the sale of “blood antiquities.”

    The Islamic State is reported to be the world’s richest terrorist organization, and it has been made rich, in part, by looting Iraq and Syria. The group’s advance has been fueled by the sale of stolen artifacts that are vital to defining the Syrian and Iraqi cultures, which pre-date Christianity, Judaism and Islam. Indeed, the ongoing pillaging of this legacy is a blow to our collective humanity.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/islamic-state-sells-blood-antiquities-from-iraq-and-syria-to-raise-money/2014/09/14/49663c98-3a7e-11e4-9c9f-ebb47272e40e_story.html

  • 15 Sep 2014 8:50 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Islamic State sells ‘blood antiquities’ from Iraq and Syria to raise money

    September 14 at 7:58 PM

    Mark Vlasic, a senior fellow and adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University, was the head of operations of the joint World Bank-U.N. Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative. He is also counselor to the Antiquities Coalition.

    As President Obama moves ahead with his plan to confront the so-called Islamic State, all options, as they say, should be on the table. Thus, while “kinetic force” is a likely focus, the terrorism financing must not be overlooked. By targeting one of the group’s funding sources, policy-makers can also help to preserve the history of ancient Mesopotamia, the cradle of civilization. What’s needed is an immediate, multifaceted initiative to curb the sale of “blood antiquities.”

    The Islamic State is reported to be the world’s richest terrorist organization, and it has been made rich, in part, by looting Iraq and Syria. The group’s advance has been fueled by the sale of stolen artifacts that are vital to defining the Syrian and Iraqi cultures, which pre-date Christianity, Judaism and Islam. Indeed, the ongoing pillaging of this legacy is a blow to our collective humanity.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/islamic-state-sells-blood-antiquities-from-iraq-and-syria-to-raise-money/2014/09/14/49663c98-3a7e-11e4-9c9f-ebb47272e40e_story.html

  • 15 Sep 2014 8:48 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Notice of Meeting of the Cultural Property Advisory Committee

    This Notice document was issued by the U.S. Department of State (DOS)

    For related information, Open Docket Folder Docket folder icon


    DEPARTMENT OF STATE
    [Public Notice: 8863; Docket No. DOS-2014-0022]

    Notice of Meeting of the Cultural Property Advisory Committee

    There will be a meeting of the Cultural Property Advisory Committee October 7-9, 2014 at the U.S. Department of State, Annex 5, 2200 C Street NW., Washington, DC. Portions of this meeting will be closed to the public, as discussed below.

    During the closed portion of the meeting, the Committee will review the proposal to extend the Memorandum of Understanding Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of El Salvador Concerning the Imposition of Import Restrictions on Certain Categories of Archaeological Material from the Prehispanic Cultures of the Republic of El Salvador (“MOU”) [Docket No. DOS-2014-0022]. An open session to receive oral public comment on the proposal to extend the MOU with El Salvador will be held on Tuesday, October 7, 2014, beginning at 10:30 a.m. EDT.

    Also, during the closed portion of the meeting, the Committee will conduct interim reviews of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Republic of Bolivia Concerning the Imposition of Import Restrictions on Archaeological Material from the Pre-Columbian Cultures and Certain Ethnological Material from the Colonial and Republican Periods of Bolivia and the Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Hellenic Republic Concerning the Imposition of Import Restrictions on Categories of Archaeological and Byzantine Ecclesiastical Ethnological Material through the 15th Century A.D. of the Hellenic Republic. Public comment, oral and written, will be invited at a time in the future should these Memoranda of Understanding be proposed for extension. In closed session, the Committee will also continue its review of the request from the Arab Republic of Egypt to enter into a bilateral agreement

    http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=DOS-2014-0022-0001

  • 11 Sep 2014 8:16 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Scythian gold returned to Kiev

    But works from Crimean museum remain in Amsterdam pending judge’s ruling

    Nineteen pieces of Scythian gold, including a fourth-century BC ceremonial helmet, have been returned by the Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam to the Museum of Historical Treasures of Ukraine. They went on public display in Kiev on Tuesday.

    The fate of another 565 items originally lent by four museums in Crimea for the same exhibition, “The Crimea: Gold and Secrets of the Black Sea”, remains in question since Russia annexed the region in March, two months before the show was originally scheduled to end.

     

    http://www.theartnewspaper.com/articles/Scythian-gold-returned-to-Kiev/35643

  • 09 Sep 2014 1:13 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Miami Is a Hub for Stolen Art and Artifacts

         

    Two summers ago, Miami was the stage for one of the strangest FBI sting operations on record. On July 17, 2012, undercover agents set up a clandestine deal in a pricey South Beach hotel room. With hidden cameras recording his every move, an unwitting suspect carefully removed the much-coveted object from inside a cardboard tube. Then the cops kicked down the door.

    But the illicit good wasn't an assault rifle or a brick of Colombian yeyo. It was a stolen painting.

    The recovery in Miami of Henri Matisse's Odalisque in Red Pants undefined described in our September 4 feature, "Vanishing Point" undefined was no fluke, however. Miami may still be maturing as an international cultural capital, but it's long been a black-market boomtown. Dozens of near-priceless pieces of art or antiquities have mysteriously surfaced in Miami, only to be seized by authorities.

    http://www.miaminewtimes.com/2014-09-11/news/miami-is-a-hub-for-stolen-art-and-artifacts/

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 

2600 Virginia Ave., NW, Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20037

Site Map · Terms of Use · Contact Us

©2000-2010. Lawyers' Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation. All rights reserved.

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software