Cultural Heritage News

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  • 04 Feb 2016 12:01 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)
    Argentina and Spain Returned to Ecuador 567 Cultural Objects PDF Imprimir E-Mail
    miércoles, 03 de febrero de 2016

    03 de febrero de 2016, 17:26Quito, Feb 3 (Prensa Latina)The Minister of Culture and Heritage of Ecuador, Guillaume Long, considered today as an example of integration the fact that Argentina and Spain returned to his country 567 cultural heritage objects.

    The also President of the National Technical Committee for Fighting Illicit Trafficking of Cultural Property reported that in the last two years Ecuador has recovered around 15,000 cultural objects stolen from the country at different times.

    Guillaume Long thanked in particular the cooperation of countries like Argentina, Spain and Chile, which returned the last items.

    http://plenglish.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=4577031&Itemid=1 

  • 04 Feb 2016 11:25 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Ratification by Ghana of the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property (Paris, 14 November 1970)

    On 20 January 2016, Ghana deposited with the Director-General its instrument of ratification of the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property.

    In accordance with the terms of Article 21, the Convention will enter into force with respect to Ghana three months after the deposit of the instrument of ratification, that is to say on 20 April 2016.

    http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=49362&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html 

  • 04 Feb 2016 11:24 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Ratification by Ghana of the Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (Paris, 2 November 2001)

    On 20 January 2016, Ghana deposited with the Director-General its instrument of ratification of the Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage.

    In accordance with the terms of its Article 27, the aforementioned Convention will enter into force with respect to Ghana three months after the date of the deposit of this instrument, that is to say on 20 April 2016.


    http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=49361&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html 

  • 29 Jan 2016 12:20 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Senator David Perdue Applauds Committee Passage of Antiquities Bill

    Posted: Friday, January 29, 2016 11:45 am

    Senator David Perdue Applauds Committee Passage of Antiquities Bill Staff Reports northwestgeorgianews.com

     

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee unanimously approved legislation introduced by Senators David Perdue (R-GA), Chuck Grassley (R-IA), and Bob Casey (D-PA) that restricts ISIS’s ability to profit from the sale of antiquities. The Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act already passed the House and now heads to the full Senate for consideration. Below are Senator Perdue’s remarks as prepared for delivery:

    “I’d like to offer a few words on the Protect and Preserve International Cultural Property Act, of which I am an original co-sponsor. I’d like to thank the Chairman and Ranking Member for putting this important legislation on today’s agenda, as well as Senator Casey, the bill’s sponsor here in the Senate.

    http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com/calhoun_times/senator-david-perdue-applauds-committee-passage-of-antiquities-bill/article_c0342716-c6a7-11e5-ab66-03baf0f84149.html

     

  • 29 Jan 2016 12:16 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Jan 29,2016 - Committee Passes Bill Restricting ISIS' Ability to Profit from Antiquities Sales



    WASHINGTON – Sen. Chuck Grassley praised unanimous committee passage of a bill substantially similar to a bill he co-sponsored to restrict the ability of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) to profit from the sale of looted antiquities. 


     http://politicalnews.me/?id=37227&keys=ISIS-ANTIQUITIES-BAN-SALE

  • 26 Jan 2016 12:33 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    To defeat ISIS, study the antiquity trade

    Yaya J. Fanusie, former CIA analyst

    23 Hours AgoCNBC.com

     

    The Islamic State's destruction of ancient sites in Syria and Iraq has dominated the headlines recently, along with claims that the group reaps enormous profits from looted antiquities. The U.S. government is focused on cutting the Islamic State's funding streams, but probably no one outside of ISIS knows exactly how much money the group is making by trafficking ancient artifacts. As a former CIA officer who worked as an economic and counterterrorism analyst, my response to the question is simple: It doesn't really matter.

    Law enforcement and intelligence officials should pay close attention to the antiquities trade emanating from Syria and Iraq, but not because they need to know precisely how much money ISIS brings in. What is important is that the trade itself reveals something about the Islamic State's operational infrastructure, its links with partners and middlemen, and how the group is exploiting the local civilian population. All of this is critical to understanding how the U.S. and its allies may defeat the group militarily, financially, and ideologically.


    http://www.cnbc.com/2016/01/25/to-defeat-isis-study-the-antiquity-trade-ex-cia-commentary.html

     

  • 26 Jan 2016 8:50 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    UNESCO Director-General and Heads of agencies discuss means to strengthen the fight against illicit trafficking

    The UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova, convened a videoconference call at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris, with the respective Heads of INTERPOL, UNIDROIT, UNODC and WCO, to measure progress and identity future collaborative actions, in close coordination with the UNSMT, for the effective implementation of the United Security Council Resolution 2199 and 2253 (2015) on the fight against illicit trafficking of cultural objects.

    The videoconference with the involved intergovernmental agencies, part of the larger network the UNESCO Director-General launched during the high level meeting on 1 April 2015, was an opportunity to ascertain areas of further collaborative action to be taken towards Member States during the course of the year.   

    http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/unesco_director_general_and_heads_of_agencies_discuss_means_to_strengthen_the_fight_against_illicit_trafficking/#.Vqd5e03VxtQ

  • 25 Jan 2016 12:32 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Economics Of Terror

    Underneath its much-publicised propaganda of the destruction of Assyrian and Babylonian sites, ISIS manages a remarkably well-organised trade in the artefacts

    Prateek Sharma, Swati Sharma


    On August 18, 2015, Khaled Mohamad al-Asaad, a Syrian archaeologist, was publically beheaded by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The cruel fate of Assad was not brought upon by conflicting with the religious ideology of ISIS, but because he refused to reveal information about thousands of invaluable artefacts hidden in the ancient city of Palmyra.

    Underneath its much-publicised propaganda of the destruction of Assyrian and Babylonian sites, ISIS manages a remarkably well-organised trade in the artefacts plundered from these ancient cities. Everything from frescoes, busts, to entire statues smuggled from Palmyra, a UNESCO world heritage site, is flooding the antiquities black markets in Europe.

    A Lebanese-French archaeologist, Joanne Farchakh, claims that antiquities from Palmyra are already available for sale in London. According to the records maintained by Abu Sayyaf, a key ISIS member killed in a United States air raid last year, this systemic trade in Syrian antiquities generates hundreds of millions of dollars for ISIS.

    http://www.outlookindia.com/article/economics-of-terror/296492

     

  • 25 Jan 2016 12:30 PM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    ISIS and Antiquities: The Missing Pieces.

    Alex Joffe

    January 25, 2016 Why does ISIS destroy and loot antiquities? Two explanations have been offered. This first is Islamic antipathy towards the pre-Islamic past. The second is that the group profits from selling looted antiquities. But there is a third and equally sinister reason that has barely been mentioned. Both destruction and looting comprise a system of social control over captive populations, a system that strives to regulate individual behavior down to the level of digging holes in the ground.

    ISIS's ideological animosity is clear enough. It is loudly trumpeted in their propaganda videos that show the destruction of antiquities sites and museums. It is also patiently explained in their online magazine Dabiq, which taunted

    http://nationalinterest.org/feature/isis-antiquities-the-missing-pieces-15005

  • 25 Jan 2016 8:33 AM | Gary Nurkin (Administrator)

    Greece a transit country for trade in illicit antiquities from Syria, Iraq

    Greece is being used as a passage to export illegal antiquities from war-torn Syria and Iraq into the West, experts warn amid reports of a clandestine police operation to net a Syrian suspect.

    “Greece is a transit country for migrants and refugees and thus it is likely that antiquities from Syria and Iraq are being smuggled through the country,” according to Lynda Albertson, CEO of the Association for Research into Crimes Against Art. 

    http://www.ekathimerini.com/205358/article/ekathimerini/news/greece-a-transit-country-for-trade-in-illicit-antiquities-from-syria-iraq

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